Working towards What?

Do you know what your goals are? And if so, are you certain that if you achieved them you would be happier, or more satisfied, than you are now?

I think many of us might answer negatively to at least one of those questions, and I’m surprised that CBT thinks that most of us know what our goals are, but that we just have difficulty working towards them.

I’m closer to thinking that most of us would be able to work towards goals that we have identified that are meaningful to us (they would be inherently aligned with us and therefore more likely to be motivating), but our difficulty is more often rather in identifying what is important to us.

So while CBT sounds like it’s a therapy that believes in the agency of the individual, I think more exploratory approaches like psychoanalysis or psychodynamic approaches have more faith in the individual’s agency to achieve their goals.
CBT assumes that we know what our goals are, just need help achieving them with a boost of willpower.
Psychoanalysis assumes that we are pretty good at going after what we want, but we often need help clarifying and unearthing those ‘truer’ or more authentic values and goals.

What sparked this thought was a guilty feeling, because I have recently started twice-weekly psychoanalysis, whilst clinician-me delivers six 30-minute sessions of Low Intensity CBT to clients suffering from similar (if not far more debilitating) mental health difficulties than patient-me. I know that if I switched roles, if I approached myself as PWP, and was told by PWP me to identify ‘Goals’ to work towards across 6 weeks in ‘therapy’, I’d be stumped. It would be totally meaningless, and potentially even distressing. What I am beginning to identify – slowly, tentatively – in psychoanalysis, is that sometimes seeking and going after goals is a blind race towards, or perhaps more accurately away from, something else as-yet-unidentified. And we don’t necessarily know what we should be striving towards or moving away from until we have stopped for a moment to reflect, and I don’t mean for a matter of moments or even days, but a stretched-out kind of reflection that happens best in the presence of a non-judgemental other. I think I am learning that healing (sometimes) can come from a moment of pause, or stillness, where for a couple of times a week you don’t need to press forward towards an unending improvement.

Admittedly, this will not apply to everyone. Despite my belief to the contrary, many of my clients say that they have found our sessions helpful and they even seem to ‘recover’ as according to the PHQ-9 and GAD-7. So, clearly, the approach taken by psychoanalysis as opposite to CBT is not for everyone, sometimes we do just need that boost of motivation, or a few handy techniques for stopping worrying so much. But maybe it’s a question then of time of life, sometimes we need CBT goal-oriented help, and at other times we need just a space to think and speak.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s