Coaches or Clinicians?

I’ve recently started training to become a Psychological Wellbeing Practitioner in an IAPT (Improving Access to Psychological Therapies) service, and what that means is that I will soon be able to deliver Low Intensity Cognitive Behavioural Therapy to ‘clients’ with mild to moderate common mental health problems such as depression and anxiety.

The training is delivered 2 days per week by lectures and seminars from University College London, and the remaining 3 days per week I spend working at my IAPT service doing assessments and low-intensity treatments.

One thing in particular that we learnt in the first week threw myself and my fellow Trainees: the fact that we should not think of ourselves as therapists or clinicians, but as coaches. We didn’t do so big-headedly, but in our previous role (when we were doing Triage Assessments and offering people Step 2 Guided Self-Help, or Low Intensity CBT), we always thought that Step 2 was a sort of CBT-lite, and so the Step 2 clinician was therefore a sort of therapist-lite.

Also, when I was learning about IAPT as an outsider, I was wrongly led to believe that the program is training ‘therapists’ not coaches. David Clark says so himself in his ‘IAPT at 10: Achievements and Challenges’ post, he writes (under the dramatic title ‘A revolution in mental health’), that to overcome the shortage of psychological therapy available to people suffering from common mental health problems, ‘the NHS has trained over 10,500 therapists and deployed them in new psychological therapy services’ (emphasis added). This is misleading, and I often find evidence of IAPT’s main advocates (usually people with a stake in the game), claiming more for the service than it deserves. I think Clark and others should be more cautious in over-selling IAPT, because it will eventually lead to disappointment when people’s expectations aren’t managed.

Thanks to that misinformation, when I used to allocate people whom I had triaged to Step 2 treatments, I always sold it as a ‘guided cognitive behavioural therapy over 6 weeks, for 30 minute sessions’. But now that we are training to be those Step 2 ‘clinicians’, we find that we are not that at all, and what we offer isn’t Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, but rather a life-coaching session.

But – I agree with this. We shouldn’t think of ourselves as clinicians or therapists because we don’t have those skills – we aren’t taught about what happens within the therapeutic relationship, and how to more supportively guide our clients through more long-lasting psychic change. I think it also serves to prevent us from feeling also like counsellors, whose role is to sit and listen to the client as they talk about whatever they feel like getting off their chest. By reminding us that we are there to encourage behaviour change (and that’s essentially it), it makes a lot of sense to call us coaches.

Having said that, however, it’s now clearer to me just how difficult I’m going to find this year in how it jars with my fundamental values and assumptions as to how psychological therapy should be. It’s odd, and I must try to check it, but I have an almost instinctual aversion to CBT and the phrase ‘evidence-based treatment’. Aaron Beck (the founder of CBT), gives me an uncomfortable feeling, I can’t help but think he’s getting something terribly wrong, or turning something complex into something robotically simple (to its detriment). I don’t have enough learning or experience to quite put into words what exactly I distrust about Beck’s cognitive approach, and I know that it has changed and improved a lot since his day so I’m probably being hugely unfair to modern practitioners of CBT, but I have read a couple of things recently that have started to confirm my uncomfortable feeling about it…

The first was a blog post by philosopher and clinical psychologist Richard Gipps, on how Beck’s turn away from psychoanalytic psychotherapy was caused by his own misunderstanding of the theory, rather than with any fundamental flaw in the approach itself.

And the second was a journal article by Michael McEachrane on the flawed assumptions that Cognitive Therapy is based on to do with what it really means to ‘think that p‘.

I’m tempted to share these two articles with the other Trainees on my course to see what they think, but I don’t want to be the bad, critical one in the bunch.

And, I do understand why IAPT uses the CBT model so religiously. The aim of IAPT is to ‘democratise psychological therapy’ – it wants to make it accessible on the NHS, and this I fervently agree with. Unfortunately, however, CBT is the only kind of therapy that can be made ‘efficient’ and ‘wide-spread’ in this way, because it’s less about the relationship that the client has with their therapist, and more about the ‘tools’ that they learn from them. So, the therapists can be quickly and inexpensively trained, because it’s not really about them and their skills.

Research has shown that this can be effective (with about a 50% recovery rate; not bad, not good?), but the jury’s out as to how long those benefits last for, and I have a feeling that the main function of having Step 2 low-intensity treatments available on the NHS isn’t so much for the good they do, but as a sifting mechanism for finding out who are the really serious cases on the waiting list who need longer-term therapy. Without Step 2, we would have one big, long waiting list for CBT Proper (Step 3), and that wouldn’t be good for anybody.